As The World’s First Sex Doll Brothel Opens, Is A Robot Version Far Behind?

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I throw around the term “inevitable” a lot—truly, it is one of my favorite words. But “inevitable” feels completely applicable in this case, of the world’s first “sex doll” brothel in Barcelona, Spain.

I was very tempted to refer to Lumi (link NSFW),”The First Sex Dolls Agency,” as a “robot brothel”…but it is unclear if these highly realistic sex dolls actually have automated (as some dolls under development are). However, it should be obvious that based on current advances in AI (not to mention, the aforementioned sex doll technology), the day of a Westworld-type scenario is not far away.

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Each of the four dolls at the “agency”—Kati, Lili, Leiza, and Aki—seem to fit a certain “type” that the customer might be interested in, whether it’s a blue-haired “anime” lass or a huge-breasted blond. Prices are up to $127 dollars and hour in a private room with a big-screen TV and choice of “viewing material” to get one in the mood. And: the dolls are thoroughly disinfected between each client usage.

Considering that these high-end sex dolls average around 5K a piece—and might be hard to explain to your family or hide indefinitely in your closet—I can see why some might be interested in Lumi’s services. But here is the big question:

Is sleeping with a sex doll—or a robot, for that matter—”cheating” on your spouse?

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Make no mistake: this is a question that will be coming up in our society—and in divorce lawyer offices everywhere—with a greater and greater frequency.

But there is another issue here, one that I’ve written about on this site many times before: the loss of human jobs to automation. As David Levy predicts in his book Love + Sex With Robots, the occupation of sex-worker might be negatively impacted by the rise of increasingly advanced sex robots:

When sexual robots are available in large numbers, a cold wind is likely to blow through the profession, causing serious unemployment. As long ago as 1983, the Guardian reported that New York prostitutes “share some of the fears of other workers—that technology developments may put them completely out of business. All the peepshows now sell substitutes—dolls to have sex with, vibrators, plastic vaginas and penises—and as one woman groused in New York, “It won’t be long before customers can buy a robot from the drug-store and they won’t need us at all.”

Will AI impact the world’s oldest profession the way it is projected to for factory workers, store clerks, and truck drivers?