Weird New Twists In Bruno Borges Case

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Bruno Borges, just hanging out.

After what has felt like an impasse for almost two months, new twists and turns have emerged in the case of missing Brazilian psychology student Bruno Borges. And while I’m not completely surprised by these developments, I don’t feel they fully “invalidate” the esoteric interests of/theories surrounding this young man either.

Basically…investigators are starting to believe that the disappearance of Borges might have been a calculated “marketing stunt” to sell his books.

The investigation is focusing on a contract found in the house of a friend of Borges, Marcelo Ferreira, made 17 days before he vanished. The contract guaranteed 15% of the sales revenue from Borges’ books to Ferreira, another friend, Márcio Gaiote, and Borges’ cousin Eduardo Velloso.

The fact that Borges allegedly might have had enough compos mentis to be thinking about book deals before he split sort of waters down the mysterious and romantic quality of this story significantly.

Furthermore, there are indications that Ferreira and Gaiote helped Borges move all his furniture out of his room during that now famous 20-day period where Borges’ family was out of town and the young man turned his room into an apparent “temple.”

Borges’ original furniture was later found in the home of Gaiote.

And so as I understand it from these local news articles (translated by Google, so maybe I’m off here and there), the Brazilian authorities/attorney’s office are pursuing the theory that Borges planned this entire thing in order to get publicity for his books (which I guess would be the 14 “encrypted” volumes his left behind). According to a one Alcino Júnior, who is working on the case:

On the day that Bruno disappeared, he went to the notary’s office and registered the contract. So it’s very hard for us that it was not a disappearance at all, it was actually a conscious plan of remoteness, and the contract shows that there is a deadline for Disclosure of these books, deadline for publication, percentage allocation for those who helped him, in the case, those three people who helped him immediately. For us, it is very clear…

The question for me then becomes: if Borges DID arrange the creation of his Giordano Bruno-themed “temple” & his disappearance in order to get publicity for the books…does that necessarily mean he did or did not believe in what he was writing?

Because the two conclusions to be made from this theory are either:

  1. Borges was a slick promoter who came up with some esoteric mumbo-jumbo just to make some money (or perhaps even fund further ventures like movies or whatever).
  2. Borges actually *DID* believe in what he was writing—perhaps even channeled the material—and made the decision to garner the publicity for the greater good of getting the material out there and read.

I mean, if you are a modern-day prophet, do you use the media in a smart manner to gain PR for your cause? Or does doing that “invalidate” you? If you’re some sort of “spirit” or alien or discarnate soul of a historical personage and you want to get the word out…are you going to pick somebody who ISN’T media-savvy? It’s a question.

But this is hardly the “end” of the case of Bruno Borges, I assure you. He’s still missing, in “hiding,” or whatever. He hasn’t given his side of the story. All his books haven’t been translated, and we don’t know what the “meat” of his philosophy/motivations are. And he still looks a goddamn lot like the 16th century philosopher Giordano Bruno, so if that was all an “act” to become the author of the Brazilian equivalent of The Celestine Prophecy—well done! Just one more Reality Winner in the Matrix, I guess.

Postscript: some people online are now apparently linking the Borges case to the enigmatic Cicada 3301 thing. This is all way too far down (way, way, way too far down) the rabbit hole for me to get into now, but maybe in the future.

More to read about on Butterfly Language:
The Inevitable Bruno Borges/”13 Reasons Why” Crossover Video
Breaking The Bruno Borges Code
The Strange Disappearance Of Bruno Silva Borges