Jumanji 2.0: Are Our Avatars Realer Than We Are?

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If you haven’t seen the 1995 movie Jumanji, you probably should. I can describe it best as a true “children’s horror movie,” despite the fantasy elements. Basically, a child gets sucked into a jungle-based game, disappears off the face of the Earth and lives in another dimension for like a long time, and then returns as a haggard traumatized adult. Meanwhile, all the scary stuff from the game—mostly animals, but also a crazy game hunter—enter “our” world through the portal (and that’s exactly what it is, a portal) of the game board itself.

Now that I’ve described the original Jumanji to you, let’s move on to the upcoming (reboot?) Jumanji: Welcome To The Jungle.

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The Metaphysics Of Lego

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With these simple building-blocks, you can create an entire universe; you are only limited by your imagination. That’s the central premise of the widely-popular Lego franchise of toys, movies, and videogames. It is a world populated by something akin to the idealized forms of Plato; where anything (vehicles, people, droplets of water) can be replicated by infinite combinations of a set # of pieces.

Lego—especially now that much of it has made the “jump” from actual physical plastic pieces to uncanny replicas of such in the digital realm—is like a blueprint not only of the underlying structure of our reality, but where reality as we actually know it might be heading in the future.

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RealityWars

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The current controversy regarding NBC’s upcoming interview with Alex Jones brought up a topic that has been on my mind—belief. NBC is being slammed for appearing to give legitimacy to Jones—and, via Jones, to Sandy Hook “truther” conspiracies.

Last night I was listening to a podcast with a person whose work I’ve found occasionally thought-provoking in the past—even though his ideas are pretty much on the fringe (you know, unlike mine). He declared on this podcast that not only did he now believe Sandy Hook was completely “fake,” but he also suspects most of the key events from the last century were as well—that they were “Hollywood”-type productions using actors

That seems like a pretty big leap to make. How could someone think this way? And what, if anything, is to be “done” about that? That’s what I’d like to discuss here.

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Crisis On Infinite Realities

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I finally got around to read the first part of this discussion between R.U. Sirius of Mondo 2000 fame, and Douglas Rushkoff—entitled, “Operation Mindfuck Was Too Successful.” And they touch upon something here that I have been thinking a lot about lately: that irony seems to be dead, and that some of the memes and colorful theories (some invented from whole cloth simply as a method for fermenting chaos) seem to be “coming to life.”

An offshoot of this is that there seems to now be multiple realities, “infinite realities,” swarming through the general population; the same bottle of Coke is simultaneously half full, half empty, and also boasting a logo that had mysteriously changed sometime after the Large Hadron Collider was first activated.

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Shazaam! Mandela Effect Manifests In CollegeHumor Video

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Sinbad in “Shaazam”

It is probably the most well-known of the so-called “Mandela Effects”—that comedian Sinbad starred in an early 1990s kids movie called Shazaam! as a genie. Numerous people online have claimed to remember this movie, but it does not seem to exist. Was the possible reason for this discrepancy some conflation of memories consisting of the Shaquille O’Neal movie Kaazam! and the fact that Sinbad once dressed like a genie for a TV film festival?

Or are we indeed in an alternate parallel universe—perhaps produced by CERN’s Large Hadron Collider—in which Kaazam! is really just a bastardized version of Shaazam!?

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