Robins, Jokers And Horus-Set: The Mythology Continues

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In my post “The Holy Trinity: Osiris, Isis, And Horus In Popular-Culture” I wrote of a persistent basic archetypal trio or “trinity” that has operated in pop-culture (especially comic books): Isis (the Mother), Osiris (the Father) and Horus (the Son). It didn’t matter if these characters were actually related to each other, or what their specific relationships with each other were. If there was a Woman (say, Supergirl) a Man (Superman) and a Child (Superboy): that was a Trinity!

For the very popular Batman franchise, this was a natural fit: Batgirl or Catwoman was the Isis-figure, Batman was Osiris, and Robin (dressed in his bird costume) made a fitting hawk-Horus.

Continue reading “Robins, Jokers And Horus-Set: The Mythology Continues”

The Holy Trinity: Osiris, Isis, And Horus In Popular-Culture

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Do you ever notice how you see the same basic tropes over and over again in TV programs, movies, video games, comic books, and whatnot?

Do you ever notice that you see the same basic tropes over and over again in mythology, folktales, religion, and whatnot?

Now, why is that? Are these writers and mythmakers and so on just really lazy? Is this some sort of conspiracy to promulgate one type of view through the bowels of our pop-culture?

I would suggest that many of these most basic tropes are passed down through the centuries and millennia because they are deeply primal and embedded in the collective human psyche.

And to explore this concept, I’ve decided to take a spotlight that most ubiquitous of comic book tropes, the Man/Woman/Boy Superhero Triad.

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“Looper” And The Postmodern Messiah

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“This is my life now, I earned it, you’ve had yours already. So why don’t you do what old men do and die? Get the fuck out of my way.”
—Young Joe, “Looper”

“And he spake also a parable unto them; No man putteth a piece of a new garment upon an old; if otherwise, then both the new maketh a rent, and the piece that was taken out of the new agreeth not with the old. And no man putteth new wine into old bottles; else the new wine will burst the bottles, and be spilled, and the bottles shall perish. But new wine must be put into new bottles; and both are preserved.”
—Luke 5:36-38, KJV

The 2012 Rian Johnson film Looper is not really a film about time-travel, though certainly that is the “device” used to facilitate the narrative. On the surface, it’s about trying to undo the mistakes of the past with hindsight—but that’s not really it, either.

Looper is nothing less than about the coming of a new Aeon, and how we can either work with the spirit of the age or resist it.

Continue reading ““Looper” And The Postmodern Messiah”